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dc.contributor.advisorGillis, Delia C. Dr.
dc.contributor.advisorSundberg, Sara Dr.
dc.contributor.advisorSanders, Geraldlyn
dc.contributor.advisorRennels, Art Dr.
dc.contributor.advisorJurkowski, Odin Dr.
dc.contributor.authorHaney, Bridget D.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-22T13:46:23Z
dc.date.available2019-02-22T13:46:23Z
dc.date.issued2018-08
dc.date.submitted2019-02-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://centralspace.ucmo.edu/handle/123456789/677
dc.description.abstractWhile the study of Black women’s history is roughly thirty years old, there is still much to uncover. The information available on the lives of black women in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries are readily available if we know where to look. It is no longer beyond the scope of imagination to see black women of the past as managers of their own destinies. In Kansas City, the legacies left behind by black women helped shape the city as we know it today. These women created and funded community-based self-help programs that laid the foundation for cultural centers, institutions of learning, and newspapers that keep the community informed. Josephine Silone Yates, Anna H. Jones, Fredericka Douglass Sprague Perry, Rosabelle Douglass Sprague Jones, Minnie L. Crosthwaite, and Ada Crogman Franklin were nationally recognized clubwomen. They set out to bring the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs motto, “lifting as we climb,” home.en_US
dc.titleBY FAIR MEANS: THE PRUDENT DIGNITY OF KANSAS CITY’S ELITE BLACK WOMEN 1890-1935en_US


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