Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKreiner, David S. Dr.
dc.contributor.advisorStark, Kim Dr.
dc.contributor.advisorSchuetz, Steven Dr.
dc.contributor.advisorJurkowski, Odin Dr.
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Sean T.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-22T14:17:47Z
dc.date.available2019-02-22T14:17:47Z
dc.date.issued2018-12
dc.date.submitted2019-02-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://centralspace.ucmo.edu/handle/123456789/688
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the impact of calculating one’s grade throughout a class on the student’s overall grade at the end of the semester. Students in the study calculated their grade on each assignment they completed in a World History or Health class and then factored that grade into all other assignments to calculate their current grade in the class. End of term grades were recorded from two World History classes and two health classes that did not self-monitor their grades. Grades from the classes that did not self-monitor were compared to grades of students from classes that did self-monitor. An Independent Samples t-test was used to analyze the data. Findings from this study indicated there was a statistically significant improvement in the end of the semester class grade for students who self-monitored while tracking their grades compared to students who did not self-monitor their grades.en_US
dc.titleAN ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN USE OF A SELF- MONITORING SYSTEM FOR ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE AND FINAL COURSE GRADESen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Electronic Theses
    Theses written by graduate students at the University of Central Missouri.

Show simple item record